Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar Coin Released, Rolls Available

by Coin Collecting News on May 19, 2011

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin

On Thursday, May 19, 2011, the United States Mint launched the Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin in more ways than one.

First, the Mint begin selling Grant Presidential $1 Coin rolls for $39.95 each, beginning at 12 noon Eastern Time (ET). The coin rolls contain 25 strikes from either the US Mint facility at Philadelphia or Denver, buyer’s choice.

Then, at 2 PM Central Time (CDT), US Mint and National Park Service officials ceremoniously released the new coins at the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site in St. Louis, Missouri. Al Runnels, the Mint’s Acting Deputy Director, and John Marszalek, the Ulysses S. Grant Association’s Executive Director, both spoke at the ceremony.

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar Rolls

Those who are interested in the Grant $1 Rolls may purchase them at http://www.usmint.gov/catalog and at 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing and speech-impaired customers may order at 1-888-321-MINT (6468). A shipping and handling fee of $4.95 will be added to all domestic orders.

Grant dollars entered circulation via the Federal Reserve Banking System on Thursday as well. The dollar represents the 18th release in the United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin Program, and the second of four 2011 Presidential Dollars.

For reference, the Mint (http://www.usmint.gov) annoucement about the coin ceremony and dollar rolls follows.

US Mint Launches Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin

ST. LOUIS – The United States Mint and the National Park Service hosted a launch ceremony to celebrate the release of the new Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin today, the 148th anniversary of Grant’s Civil War Vicksburg campaign in Mississippi.

"Beginning today, Federal Reserve Banks are releasing millions of Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coins into circulation to be used by Americans everywhere in the nation," United States Mint Acting Deputy Director Al Runnels said in his remarks. "Americans know Grant best as the victorious general in the Civil War, and these new coins can’t help but remind us of that defining period in our history, but they will also connect America to Grant’s two terms as our 18th President."

John Marszalek, executive director of the Ulysses S. Grant Association, joined Runnels at the coin launch, which was held at the Ulysses S. Grant National Historic Site in St. Louis. The site is where Grant and his wife Julia occasionally resided during the 1850s. Members of the public who attended the event were among the first in the Nation to get the new $1 coin. Following the ceremony, each attendee 18 years old and younger received a Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin to commemorate the event, while adults exchanged their currency for 25-coin rolls of the new coin.

The Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin is the 18th release in the United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin Program, authorized by Public Law 109-145, the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005. The coin’s obverse (heads side) features a portrait of former President Grant by United States Mint Sculptor-Engraver Don Everhart and the inscriptions ULYSSES S. GRANT, IN GOD WE TRUST, 18th PRESIDENT and 1869-1877. The coin’s reverse (tails side), also by Everhart, features a dramatic rendition of the Statue of Liberty. Inscriptions on the reverse are $1 and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, with E PLURIBUS UNUM, 2011 and the mint mark (P or D) incused on the edge.

Ulysses S. Grant was born in Ohio in 1822. He attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and fought in the Mexican War under General Zachary Taylor. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Grant was appointed to command an unruly volunteer regiment. After he won battles at Vicksburg, Miss., and Chattanooga, Tenn., Lincoln appointed him general-in-chief in March 1864. Grant, a symbol of Union victory during the Civil War, was the Republican Party’s logical candidate for President in 1868. During his administration, Yellowstone was established as the first national park, and Congress passed a bill calling for equal pay for women and men holding similar jobs in federal government agencies. After retiring from the presidency, Grant learned that he had cancer of the throat. At the suggestion of author Mark Twain, he wrote his memoirs. Soon after completing the last page, he died on July 23, 1885.

The United States Mint, created by Congress in 1792, is the Nation’s sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce. The United States Mint also produces proof, uncirculated and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; and silver, gold and platinum bullion coins.

Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coin Rolls Available

WASHINGTON – Customers may begin ordering rolls of Ulysses S. Grant Presidential $1 Coins through the United States Mint’s Web site, http://www.usmint.gov/catalog, on May 19 at noon Eastern Time (ET). The collectible rolls are priced at $39.95 each.

Each roll of Presidential $1 Coins contains 25 circulating quality coins from either the United States Mint facility at Philadelphia or Denver. The coins are wrapped with United States Mint coin paper displaying the mint of origin ("P" or "D"), "$25" (the face value of its contents) and the name of the President.

In addition to ordering at the United States Mint’s Web site, customers also may order by calling 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468). Hearing- and speech-impaired customers may order at 1-888-321-MINT (6468). A shipping and handling fee of $4.95 will be added to all domestic orders.

The Presidential $1 Coin rolls are also available through the United States Mint Online Subscription Program. Once enrolled in the program, customers will receive automatic shipments of future Presidential $1 Coin rolls when they are released. For more information about this convenient ordering method, visit http://www.usmint.gov/catalog.

The United States Mint, created by Congress in 1792, is the Nation’s sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce. The United States Mint also produces proof, uncirculated and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; and silver, gold and platinum bullion coins.

Note: To ensure that all members of the public have fair and equal access to United States Mint products, orders placed prior to the official on-sale date and time of May 19, 2011, at noon ET shall not be deemed accepted by the United States Mint and will not be honored. For more information, please review the United States Mint’s Frequently Asked Questions, Answer ID #175.

{ 13 comments… read them below or add one }

Charlene Baker August 15, 2011 at 7:52 pm

My son found one of these coins. Is it worth a dollar or worth more?

johnny quick November 15, 2011 at 9:09 pm

what value do 1867 coin like this have, it just worth $1?

Me December 29, 2011 at 3:43 pm

I found one, how much is it worth?

Coin Collecting News Staff December 29, 2011 at 4:52 pm

The ones minted for circulation are worth $1.

wendell winn January 19, 2012 at 4:36 pm

I found a one dollar coin the date on it was 1869-1877 ,is it silver or gold? Is it worth more than one dollar?

angie March 20, 2012 at 6:54 pm

i found a gold one 1869-1877. what is it worth?

landan April 17, 2012 at 5:09 pm

its only worth a dollar

Matt April 30, 2012 at 10:01 pm

It says 1869-1877 because those where the years the president wuz in office. as for its worth. its just only a dolor.

Sara May 16, 2012 at 2:09 pm

Mine has no date on it at all. Is it legitimate?

rory February 28, 2013 at 10:42 pm

There is much confusion over these. It is a commemorative coin, produced by the USA mint… one in an ongoing series. (18th of..) “Golden” color clad, base metal blank, struck w/ a die, to be this memorial edition.(2011) It can be used as, indeed it is, real+actual currency, but cool history lesson included.(no xtra chrg) In general circulation, it is valued at one buck, spends as a dollar, and it is a dollar.(coin) Given time it will gain some numismatic value (type of collector) for being limited number made.
For purpose of saving/collecting, need to be in un-circulated condition, kept in original (govt), as released and/or distributed, packaging/wrapping/presentation/lense. Cool, and thanks..

Ashley July 26, 2013 at 10:48 pm

It is worth 2.99 as of right now

Betty H October 18, 2013 at 9:01 am

Several months ago I was given three of these coins by the local Chrysler dealership. I put them aside and forgot about them. Although I have a couple of pieces of “legal tender” (one half-dime and a $2.00 bill [not to mention all or most of the “states” quarters), I have no interest in numismatics and keep them only because they may someday be worth more than face-value (but I have no hope that will happen in my lifetime).

I am bothered about these Grant coins in that they lack the mint mark. According to this site, they were minted in both Philadelphia and Denver. Unless the mint marks are invisible or are incredible tiny, there is none. How legal are THESE coins?

Thank you,

Coin Collecting News October 18, 2013 at 9:09 am

Betty H, They are legal tender, and are used a bit more widely in some areas of the country, rarely in others. People have shown a preference for the lightness of the dollar bill which has hurt the acceptance and use of dollar coins. The mint marks are found on the edges of the coin.

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